Camembert (de Normandie)

/KAH-mum-behr/
[French]

A disc of soft blue cheese made with cow's milk. It has a mild, creamy, ivory paste with blue veins and a white penicillin rind, is wrapped in waxed paper and boxed. It is named after a village in Auge and is said to have been invented by Marie Harel, nowbeing made industrially and on dairies. This cheese is eaten all year round, is made with raw, whole milk and contains 45% (21%) fat. The curds are uncooked and unpressed. It may be found measuring 10.5-11 cm (4" ) diameter x 3-4 cm ( 1┬Ż) deep, weighing 250 g (9 oz). Affinage is usually round 21 days. Look for the words 'Veritable Camembert de Normandie' and 'au lait cru', meaning raw (unpasteurised) milk. Because a judgement of 1926 decreed that Camembert could not be awarded AOC status, Camemberts are now widely produced, in more than 60 d├ępartements in France and even outside France, although 'Camembert de Normandie' does now have AOC status. (AOC-1983).

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